CVS to start offering COVID vaccine at 100 pharmacies across California

C

Modesto and Yuba City are just a couple of the cities throughout California where the 81,900 total doses will be distributed

MODESTO, Calif. — CVS pharmacies across California will begin administering vaccinations starting on Thursday, Feb. 11.

According to a press release from the company, roughly 100 pharmacy locations, including Modesto and Yuba City, that will receive doses from a lot of about 81,900 total doses that will be distributed across all the participating CVS locations. The participating pharmacies are in Modesto, Agoura Hills, Bakersfield, Carmel, Carlsbad, Chula Vista, Clovis, Eureka, Huntington Beach, Irvine, La Jolla, Los Angeles, Monterey, Newport Beach, San Diego, San Francisco, Sonoma, Sunnyvale, Ventura and Yuba City. 

The press release went on to say it will expand the vaccinations to more pharmacies and locations as more vaccines become available.

“One of our greatest strengths as a company is our presence in communities across the country, which makes us an ideal partner for administering vaccines in a safe, convenient and familiar manner,” Karen S. Lynch, President and Chief Executive Officer of CVS Health, said in the press release.

California is part of an 11 state rollout of the vaccines, taking place at about 335 CVS pharmacy locations across the country. The other states participating are Connecticut, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia.

CVS said the eventual goal is to make vaccines available at locations across the country with the ability to administer 20-25 million doses per month.

How to register for a CVS COVID vaccination appointment

CVS is following California state guidelines on vaccinations, so vaccines will only be available to people who fall into the criteria to receive vaccinations right now. Current state criteria means that people over 65 and health care workers are eligible.

To signup for an appointment, people must register in advance on CVS’ website or through the CVS Pharmacy app. Walk-in vaccine appointments will not be available. People can start booking appointments on Tuesday, Feb. 9, when stores receive their shipments of the vaccine. 

To see if you meet the eligibility requirements and book an appointment through CVS, click HERE.

California lawmaker scraps plan for preteen vaccine consent

Currently, minors age 12 to 17 in California cannot be vaccinated without permission from their parents or guardians, except for vaccinations to prevent STD’s.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — California lawmakers on Thursday amended a bill that would have let preteens be vaccinated against a range of health conditions without their parents’ consent, instead raising the proposed minimum age to 15, which would still be among the youngest in the U.S.

Currently, minors age 12 to 17 in California cannot be vaccinated without permission from their parents or guardians, except for vaccinations to prevent sexually transmitted diseases. California state law already allows people 12 and older to consent to the Hepatitis B and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines.

The bill that cleared the state Senate last month on a 21-8 vote would have allowed those age 12 and up to receive any vaccine that has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, including against the coronavirus, even if their parents objected. It would have been the youngest age of consent in any state.

Republican Assemblyman Kevin Kiley said in a tweet that the bill was “nowhere close” to having the needed 41 votes to pass the Assembly.

Catie Stewart, spokesperson for the bill’s author, Democratic Sen. Scott Wiener, said supporters of the measure were close to having enough votes in the Assembly, but “it wasn’t a slam dunk.”

“We think that this will help make it easier,” she said. “And we think the majority of the people who will use, who will take advantage of this are going to be 15 to 18, so we thought it was a good compromise.”

The amendment will not change the lower age of consent for vaccines related to sexually transmitted diseases.

Wiener’s measure is the latest coronavirus-related bill to run into headwinds. Several other proposals stalled as the winter pandemic wave subsided, leaving his as perhaps the most controversial remaining legislation.

Gov. Gavin Newsom and Sen. Richard Pan both delayed until next year measures relating to school vaccinations, and Assemblymember Buffy Wicks withdrew her bill that would have forced all California businesses to require coronavirus vaccines for their employees.

Stewart acknowledged that a lot of members of the Assembly had concerns with the lower age, and “we want to work with people to get this across the finish line.”

Alabama allows children to consent to vaccines starting at age 14, Oregon at 15 and Rhode Island and South Carolina at 16. Cities including Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., allow children age 11 and up to consent to COVID-19 vaccines, and in San Francisco the age is 12 and older.

Republican Assemblymember Heath Flora said raising the age to 15 “does not go far enough.”

“The state over the years has tried to give 17-year-olds the right to vote and 12-year-olds the right to make medical decisions,” he said. “But we do not want to prosecute criminals as adults until they’re age 25 because their brains are not fully developed.”

Booster shots approved for kids 5-11 years old | Need to Know

I know school is getting out and people aren’t really thinking about COVID right now but it is in the community.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — The Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has expanded the age eligibility for COVID-19 booster shots. 

On May 17, the FDA altered the emergency use authorization for the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, allowing kids between the ages of 5 – 11 years old the ability to receive the single booster dose. Also, on May 19, the CDC endorsed their vote to expand the age eligibility.

Kids must complete their primary series, which is the first and second dose of the vaccine, once it’s been five months since their second dosage of the vaccine, they are eligible to receive the booster. 

Parents who wish to signup their child should head to MyTurn to make a booster appointment. Also, Sacramento County offers the booster shot at all of its public health clinics and keeps a list on its website that’s updated weekly. 

“I know school is getting out and people aren’t really thinking about COVID right now, but it is in the community,” Rachel Allen, Sacramento County’s Immunization Program Manager, said.

COVID cases within the past month have slowly increased, especially in Sacramento County. According to the county’s database, fully vaccinated kids between 5 – 11 years old are only 37% vaccinated. 

“We want kids to get out over the summer, enjoy time with friends and family, be social, and we also want them to be protected,” Allen said. “If you haven’t started that primary series, I would just encourage folks to please do so as soon as you can.”

San Francisco eases mask rule, official says LA not ready

San Francisco health officials say that the city’s rapidly dropping case rates will allow the lifting of some indoor mask mandates starting Feb. 1

SAN FRANCISCO — COVID-19 case numbers are on the decrease in Los Angeles County but a top health official says it’s too soon to consider relaxing mask and vaccination requirements in LA — as San Francisco plans to do next week. 

LA County reported just over 26,000 new coronavirus cases, down over the past two weeks from about 46,000, the highest daily number since the start of the pandemic. Health director Barbara Ferrer says LA County has likely passed the peak of omicron transmission.

San Francisco health officials say that the city’s rapidly dropping case rates will allow the lifting of some indoor mask mandates starting Feb. 1. According to ABC7, starting Feb. 1, people can remove masks indoor places like gyms or offices if a there’s 100% vaccination rate and boosters are current. Marin County and Sonoma County are also updating their health guidelines, as well. 

California bill aims to remove personal belief exemption for kids and the COVID vaccine

If passed, the law would go into effect January 1, 2023. If your child is not vaccinated, they will not be allowed to attend in-person learning.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — A proposed California law would eliminate a personal belief exemption in school-based COVID-19 vaccination requirements.

Democratic Sen. Richard Pan introduced the Keep Schools Open and Safe Act on Monday in Los Angeles. Dr. Pan, who is also a pediatrician, says the law is needed to ensure that children are educated. 

The legislation would build on a 2015 law that eliminated the personal belief exemption for all other childhood vaccinations required for schoolchildren. 

Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom in October announced the nation’s first coronavirus vaccine mandate for schoolchildren. So, why introduce this bill? Because the only way to get rid of the personal belief exemptions is if the state adds it to the list of ten other state-mandated vaccines. 

Dr. Pan said his goal is to create certainty that kids will be safe at school. 

“Families across the state and country have faced disruption, anxiety, and trauma from this pandemic for now almost two years,” Dr. Pan said. “Confidence and certainty are things we all long for and yet that certainty repeatedly seems to be out of reach.”

He knows this bill will come with opposition.

“There’s oftentimes people trying to say that children aren’t affected by the virus. We know that’s not true,” he said. “Children can get very sick.”

Republican Assemblymember James Gallagher points out that just last week Dr. Pan introduced a bill to allow kids 12 and up to get vaccinated without parental permission. 

“Now, the truth really comes out. Last week, basically the same group of legislators was saying this was all about giving children a choice as to whether or not to get the vaccine,” Gallagher said. “Now, it becomes clear today that there is no choice. The only choice available to you is if you decide to get vaccinated because this same group will kick you out of school if you decide not to get vaccinated.”

Gallagher said the COVID vaccine should not be compared to the ten other required vaccines for school-aged kids in California because those have had FDA approval for decades.

“Democrats need to understand, you have to stop trying to take parents out of the equation. Parents are absolutely vital to decisions about their health care, their child’s health care, and their child’s education,” he said. “Make no mistake about it, if this were to pass, many kids are going to exit the school system.”

If the bill passes, it will go into effect on Jan. 1, 2023. 

Something that Gallagher and others point out, since Newsom first announced his version of a vaccine mandate for kids three months ago, only one other state has followed suit: Louisiana. 

Unlike Newsom’s version, the bill doesn’t mention FDA approval as a clause at all. 

Senator Pan said they may need to revise the bill if the FDA doesn’t give full approval of a vaccine come 2023. 

About the author

Surjo Das

Surjo Das is a Digital Media Publisher and freelance copywriter. He has been working in the publishing industry for over 5 years now, holding various positions at different publishing houses Worldwide. His work experience includes managing marketing campaigns, content development, and website maintenance for various industries including healthcare, IT, finance, and education. He also offers to ghostwrite services to help aspiring authors get their books published while maintaining creative control over the project.

Add Comment

By Surjo Das

Surjo Das

Surjo Das is a Digital Media Publisher and freelance copywriter. He has been working in the publishing industry for over 5 years now, holding various positions at different publishing houses Worldwide. His work experience includes managing marketing campaigns, content development, and website maintenance for various industries including healthcare, IT, finance, and education. He also offers to ghostwrite services to help aspiring authors get their books published while maintaining creative control over the project.

Get in touch

Quickly communicate covalent niche markets for maintainable sources. Collaboratively harness resource sucking experiences whereas cost effective meta-services.

error: Content is protected !!